My Own Walden

A few years ago, I had a co-worker who was forever being reprimanded for reading on the job. As his customers clamored for their Vegetable Alfredo’s and Pork Cutlet’s, he hid in the waiter’s lounge squinting at a tiny copy of Henry David Thoreau’s book, Walden. Although Eric was continually warned, the manager never took the book away from him adding, “I’ve read it twice.” “Twice,” Eric echoed in awe. Always one for a challenge, I bought a copy of Walden and joined Eric in his rogue reading sessions, helping fulfill Thoreau’s prophecy that readers would “come to this page to spend borrowed or stolen time, robbing your creditors of an hour.”

A Transcendentalist in New York: Thoreau’s Staten Island Experience

New York’s “forgotten borough” – Staten Island – is almost never considered as having any claim to literary history or distinction at all. And yet American writers like Herman Melville, Ralph Waldo Emerson, Henry David Thoreau, Henry James and Edwin Arlington Robinson all had connections to the island, whether through family or actually having called the island home at one point in their lives. Of all these writers, it was Thoreau who established the deepest connection to the island”s people, land and, most of all, surrounding ocean.

An Encounter with William Stafford

A life that gives rise to 51 books in the short span of 79 years can certainly be regarded as literary. William Stafford lived such a life.

At Home With Virginia Woolf

By Chris Hudson In the final entry of her diary on 24th March 1941, Virginia Woolf left no clues to […]

I am Not an Original Groundling

By Michael Hartigan (From the Literary Traveler Archive) I am not an original Groundling. Nor could I ever be, what […]

Hemingway in the Snow

Hemingway’s tracks in the snow are easy to follow. This was the Hemingway of the 20’s. Back from the Great War, Hemingway was still on his way. A reporter based in Paris for the Toronto Star, a roving correspondent writing down what he saw in typical staccato sentences; he was juggling a vast appetite for life and a tiny budget.

Norway’s Native Children

By Julie Hatfield In preparing for a cruise along the coast of Norway last summer, I asked the cruise ship […]

Buddhism the Jack Kerouac Way: A South Korean Templestay

By Ailsa Ross Jack Kerouac’s novel, The Dharma Bums, is so full of sweet words and joy that every line […]

The Faces of Vincent van Gogh

By Kerry Lee “I have moments when I am twisted with enthusiasm or madness or prophecy, like a Greek Oracle […]

Hannah’s Dream: A Conversation with the Granddaughter of Welsh Poet Dylan Thomas

Literary Traveler is honored to publish the following interview with Jill Paris, author of Life is Like a Walking Safari, and Hannah […]