Witches, Gables and ‘Haunted Happenings’: A Visit to Salem

By Amanda Festa With Halloween quickly approaching, here at Literary Traveler, we have really gotten into the spirit of the […]

I Am Providence: The City that Made H.P. Lovecraft

by Robert Anasi I never can be tied to raw new things, For I first saw the light in an […]

Shirley Jackson’s Outsider Perspective of Bennington, Vermont

by Katy Kelleher Leaf season had already peaked and the famous green mountains had faded to a burnished gold. The […]

Literary Halloween – Part I: 5 Costumes with Character

By Jessica Monk Halloween, I confess: I’ve failed you. My costumes have been offbeat, inappropriate, and dangerously conceptual. Being a […]

Literary Halloween – Part II: 10 Couples Costumes for Book Lovers

By Amanda Festa Couples costumes can be hard to pull off. They require the perfect mix of chemistry, good humor, […]

Sunrise at Walden Pond

by Francis McGovern The morning was a time that offered much to Henry David Thoreau and Walden Pond seemed a […]

Thoreau’s Other Waters: The Concord River

When reading Thoreau for the first time, a reader might assume that the writer is speaking aloud his mind, giving […]

My Own Walden

A few years ago, I had a co-worker who was forever being reprimanded for reading on the job. As his customers clamored for their Vegetable Alfredo’s and Pork Cutlet’s, he hid in the waiter’s lounge squinting at a tiny copy of Henry David Thoreau’s book, Walden. Although Eric was continually warned, the manager never took the book away from him adding, “I’ve read it twice.” “Twice,” Eric echoed in awe. Always one for a challenge, I bought a copy of Walden and joined Eric in his rogue reading sessions, helping fulfill Thoreau’s prophecy that readers would “come to this page to spend borrowed or stolen time, robbing your creditors of an hour.”

A Walk to Walden Pond

A Walk commemorating the importance of Henry David Thoreau Walden and Don Henley’s The Boys of Summer. Literary Traveler Home […]

A Transcendentalist in New York: Thoreau’s Staten Island Experience

New York’s “forgotten borough” – Staten Island – is almost never considered as having any claim to literary history or distinction at all. And yet American writers like Herman Melville, Ralph Waldo Emerson, Henry David Thoreau, Henry James and Edwin Arlington Robinson all had connections to the island, whether through family or actually having called the island home at one point in their lives. Of all these writers, it was Thoreau who established the deepest connection to the island”s people, land and, most of all, surrounding ocean.