At Shelley’s Grave: The Ineffable Calico Cat at il Cimitero Straniero

So I said, most impractically, to the obliging calico cat with yellow eyes, as we turned to depart the old Protestant Cemetery, that walled oasis of green quietude in the midst of hurried, cacophonous Rome.

Naulakha, Rudyard Kipling’s Priceless Jewel

By Ann Wallace I feel no twinge of conscience To deny me any theme When care has cast her anchor […]

John Keats and the Casina Rosa

The “Casina Rossa” or “Little Red House” sits next to the Spanish Steps in the Piazza di Spagna in Rome. An unprepossessing building built in 1725, it blends in with the neighboring three and four story buildings surrounding the piazza. The Casina Rossa is not renowned for its distinctive architecture, but instead for its many distinguished occupants, the most famous of whom was John Keats, the great English Romantic poet.

The Legacy of Dylan Thomas in Wales

Since the untimely death of Dylan Thomas in November 1953, the writer’s popularity has escalated, especially in his native Wales. In Swansea, the city of his birth, people who are otherwise uninterested in all things literary, flock to readings of Under Milk Wood and engage in lively discussions about it afterwards.

Lord Byron’s Castle Chillon

Lord Byron’s set made it famous and it’s still a sight to see. Surveying Castle Chillon, an exquisite jewel that […]

The Persuasive and Provincial Jane Austen

By Sara Wilson Jane Austen was a provincial lady who wrote about the provincial society she knew so well. Yet […]

William Shakespeare’s Globe Theater

A crowd of twentieth century “groundlings” stands in the open yard of the new Globe Theatre in Bankside, London. We’ve paid five pounds approximately $8.50 to see a performance of The Life of Henry the Fift (Henry V.) In the early 1600s, at the first Globe Theatre Shakespeare’s “Wooden O,” groundlings (commoners) paid one English penny.