Socialism and Green Spaces: William Morris’s Walthamstow

By Peter Turner ‘Have you ever wondered why there’s so much suffering in the world?’ asked the suited young man. […]

Weaving Tales: The Tools of Text

By Janice Horton On a back road in an out of the way township in northeast Pennsylvania, a seasonal museum […]

Beatrix Potter, More Than Just Bunnies: The Legacy of Beatrix Potter

by Deborah Straw Beatrix Potter may be best known as the creator of charming characters like Peter Rabbit, Mrs. Tiggy […]

Emily Dickinson’s Homestead

As a junior in high school, studying American Literature for the first time, I claimed Emily Dickinson as my poet. I felt as though I alone were given the gift to decode her poems. The rest of my class wanted to read more accessible poetry; they hated Dickinson’s verse and were indifferent to her life story. Her use of elusive imagery and fourth-definition choices for words frustrated them but only increased my desire to study the poems more closely. I wanted to understand enough about Emily Dickinson so that I could emulate her.